FREEDOM by recognizing the problem and confessing

Stand fast therefore in the liberty wherewith Christ hath made us free, and be not entangled again with the yoke of bondage.
Galatians 5:1 KJV

Pornography is everywhere and it can start innocently or even by accident. However, once it becomes part of our lives, it sinks deeper and deeper into the dark places of our soul. In the end, pornography objectifies sex and makes it small and meaningless. It poisons relationships and how we view and treat others.

Based on hundreds of conversations with men seeking to get out of the trap of porn, my guess is you are not here to find out whether porn is a problem. You are here to get help to get rid of the problem. Once we acknowledge the problem, we must see it for what it is and admit our sins. But admitting our sins is the first step and not the last.

Repentance is an often-misunderstood concept. For many, repentance means admitting sin and saying we are sorry. However, there is much more to it than that. In Greek, the word means to turn away from sin. However, the Bible actually goes much deeper and talks about a change of mind that results in a change of action.

Changing our actions means no longer pretending we can exercise more self-control and manage the temptations. It means we don’t believe the lies that we can handle this or it will go away when we get married. Now is the time to stop kidding yourself that you will pray more, read the Bible more, or go to church more to win this battle. Repent from your sin and keep reading to learn how to win the battle and become free.

PRAYER

Father God, please give me the strength to trust you. Give me the courage to admit my sin and seek a change of mind that results in a change of action. Help me discover the power that comes from putting you first in my life and deliver me into freedom from this sin. Amen.

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Daily Hymn Sharing

Daily Hymn Sharing
Where Is My Home, a movie adapted from a Christian’s real-life experiences. This story is moving and full of twists and turns. It has received a lot of praises and won awards in the film festivals of several countries. Moreover, the theme song sings out the hearts’ voice of many people, move people to tears. It’s icing on the cake. Now, let’s feel this impressive theme song!
Walk in the Love of God | Christian Music Video 2018 “Where Is My Home” (Heart-touching Theme Song)
With my tiny paper and brush, I paint a little house.
Momma’s inside the house, Daddy is inside too.
My sister and I are playing in the sunlight.
We all feel warm as the sun shines on us.
Momma is smiling, Daddy smiles too.
Sisters are grinning, we are all beaming.
This is my family here, painted on my paper.
A picture in my dreams. It is all in my dreams.
Picking up my tiny suitcase, I go to a strange place.
Daddy is inside but Momma is outside.
Picking up my tiny suitcase, I go to a home I once knew.
Momma is inside, Daddy’s outside.
Holding tightly to my suitcase, I wander the roads.
Feeling alone, not sure where to go.
My tiny suitcase here is my only company.
This is my only home, the home I can’t escape.
Where is my home? Oh where could it be?
In such a great world, yet there is nowhere for me.
Who can deliver me to the home in my dreams,
the one in my drawing, the one of my dreams?
Where is my home? Oh where could it be?
In such a great big world, there is still no home for me.
Who can give me a cozy home, the home in my drawings,
the home in my dreams, home in my dreams?
Here, I have a home. I have a home.
But it’s not the one I drew on my paper.
It’s not my little suitcase, it’s the place that I dream of.
Mom and Dad are inside, my sister and I are too.
It is the home where our souls can finally rest,
the home full of glory, full of glory and hope.
It is the home (it is the home)
where our souls can finally rest (souls can finally rest),
the home full of glory, full of glory and hope.
It is a home full of glory, home full of glory, glory and hope.
from Follow the Lamb and Sing New

10 Virtues of a Good Woman

1. Faith –

A Virtuous Woman serves God with all of her heart, mind, and soul. She seeks His will for her life and follows
His ways. (Proverbs 31: 26, Proverbs 31: 29 – 31, Matthew 22: 37, John 14: 15, Psalm 119: 15)

2. Marriage –

A Virtuous Woman respects her husband. She does him good all the days of her life. She is trustworthy
and a helpmeet. (Proverbs 31: 11- 12, Proverbs 31: 23, Proverbs 31: 28, 1 Peter 3, Ephesians 5, Genesis2: 18)

3. Mothering

A Virtuous Woman teaches her children the ways of her Father in heaven. She nurtures her children with
the love of Christ, disciplines them with care and wisdom, and trains them in the way they should go. (Proverbs 31: 28,
Proverbs 31: 26, Proverbs 22: 6, Deuteronomy 6, Luke 18: 16)

4. Health –

A Virtuous Woman cares for her body. She prepares healthy food for her family. (Proverbs 31: 14 – 15, Prov￾erbs 31: 17, 1 Corinthians 6: 19, Genesis 1: 29, Daniel 1, Leviticus 11)

5. Service

A Virtuous Woman serves her husband, her family, her friends, and her neighbors with a gentle and loving spirit. She is charitable. (Proverbs 31: 12, Proverbs 31: 15, Proverbs 31: 20, 1 Corinthians 13: 13)

6. Finances

A Virtuous Woman seeks her husband’s approval before making purchases and spends money wisely. She is careful to purchase quality items which her family needs. (Proverbs 31: 14, Proverbs 31: 16, Proverbs 31: 18, 1 Timothy 6:
10, Ephesians 5: 23, Deuteronomy 14: 22, Numbers 18: 26)

7. Industry

A Virtuous Woman works willingly with her hands. She sings praises to God and does not grumble while
completing her tasks. (Proverbs 31: 13, Proverbs 31: 16, Proverbs 31: 24, Proverbs 31: 31, Philippians 2: 14)

8. Homemaking

A Virtuous Woman is a homemaker. She creates an inviting atmosphere of warmth and love for her family and guests. She uses hospitality to minister to those around her. (Proverbs 31: 15, Proverbs 31: 20 – 22, Proverbs 31:
27, Titus 2: 5, 1 Peter 4: 9, Hebrews 13: 2)

9. Time

– A Virtuous Woman uses her time wisely. She works diligently to complete her daily tasks. She does not spend time dwelling on those things that do not please the Lord. (Proverbs 31: 13, Proverbs 31: 19, Proverbs 31: 27, Ecclesiastes 3,
Proverbs 16: 9, Philippians 4:8 )

10. Beauty

A Virtuous Woman is a woman of worth and beauty. She has the inner beauty that only comes from Christ.
She uses her creativity and sense of style to create beauty in her life and the lives of her loved ones. (Proverbs 31: 10Prov￾erbs 31: 21 – 22, Proverbs 31: 24 -25, Isaiah 61: 10, 1 Timothy 2: 9, 1 Peter 3: 1 – 6)

Who can find a virtuous woman? For her price is far above rubies.” Proverbs 31:10

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Continue reading “10 Virtues of a Good Woman”

Verse of the day

Heb.11.4 – By faith Abel offered unto God a more excellent sacrifice than Cain, by which he obtained witness that he was righteous, God testifying of his gifts: and by it he being dead yet speaketh. (KJV)

#Parenting :Teenagers and the New world (internet) Part 1

Almost all teenagers in first-world countries have a strong Internet presence and extensively share personal content and opinions online.
The 2011 Pew Internet survey reported that 95% of U.S. young adults between ages 12 through 17 are online, of whom, 80% have profiles on social media sites, as compared to only 64% of the online population aged 30 and older.
Why is there so much media use among teenagers? The answer lies largely in the change in lifestyle of the upwardly mobile population where increasing numbers of single working parent and dual-working parent households raise latchkey kids and after school programs that eat into play and socialization time of the kids. The lack of time for face-to-face socialization is compounded by practical issues such as mobility difficulties, curfew legislations and parental restrictions that stem from fears of predators, drug dealers and gangs. Changes in society, market and law, along with the advent of Internet and its various applications, have thus resulted in the emergence of a decentralized social life in a virtual setting.
The increased presence of youth online has raised serious concerns about the safety of Internet and social media use. Difficulty in self-regulation, lack of awareness of repercussions of privacy compromise and susceptibility to peer pressure are listed as reasons for teenagers’ cavalier attitude towards online risks such as sexting, cyberbullying and exposure to inappropriate content as they navigate the tricky waters of social media. On the other hand, there has also been
criticism of the moral panic that surrounds the safety of extensive digital (in particular Internet/social networking) use by youth. So, is Internet really a minefield or is it just a digital-extension of the pervasive stereotype that demonizes youth?
Moral panic notwithstanding, the risks of Internet and social media to teenagers is just as real as the risks in society. Cyberbullying, in the forms of name-calling and gossiping, spreading rumors, making threats or otherwise sending malicious messages through emails, message boards and social media, has augmented offline bullying and estimates of the incidence of cyber bullying range from 23 to 72% in various studies (see here , here and
here ). Exposure to age-inappropriate content is another serious risk because it causes much damage to an age-group that is already prone to sexual uncertainty and uncommitted and possibly unsafe sexual exploration. Dangerous communities that support self-harm activities, such as anorexia, drug use, and such other disruptive concepts are also serious pitfalls of unsupervised Internet usage among teens.
Of course, seeing the above risks as standalone perils will raise mass hysteria against youth or Internet or more likely, both. It must be remembered that the online risks to adolescents is a subset of overall teenage hazards. Youngsters already emotionally imbalanced or prone to disruptive behavior are obviously more vulnerable online and are more likely to commit to unsafe or irresponsible actions in the virtual world. However, there are some risks that are common to all youngsters and such risks are largely built on the attitude and behavior of the youth themselves, rather than them being victims of an unfair attack.
Research has shown that there is a positive correlation between parents’ level of privacy concern and that of their teenaged children. Thus, parents can influence their children’s attitudes and behavior through advice and perhaps monitoring the media presence of these teenagers. However, the latter could be a double-edged sword, as teenagers, naturally inclined to rebel against parental insurgence into their private space, may practice deception, which may override any parental measure to increase safety. For example, adolescents may use pseudonyms and false identifying information like age and location to protect themselves, on the advice of their parents. Ironically, the same technique could also be adopted by them to insulate themselves from the eyes of parents.
Many youngsters suppose that security through obscurity is protection enough. Teen bloggers, for example, often believe that their audience is limited to their friends and (less likely) family and could reveal compromising information and exhibit themselves in provocative and socially unacceptable forms. The personal anonymity of the Internet is, however deceptive, especially for teens , who are the focus of two groups of people — parents, teachers, local government officials, etc., who may wish to protect them, and marketers and predators that do harm.
Peluchette and Karl from the University of Southern Indiana found that young adults in the U.S. expressed little concern about sharing updates and pictures on social network sites such as Facebook. Women were more concerned about future employers seeing some of their pictures and comments, especially those related to alcohol, than men. The women were justified by a 2013 survey that reports that 1 of every 10 young job applicants was rejected because of content they had posted on social media , including “provocative or inappropriate photos or posts,” and “content about drinking or using drugs.”
Online victimization of youth is only one head of Janus. The youngster, without proper guidance, could be a perpetrator herself; indeed. A recent study by McAfee reports that 15% of teens have hacked a social network account, 30.7% access pirated movies and music, 8.7% have hacked someone’s email online, 16% of teens having admitted to looking for test answers on their phone and 48.1% of teens having looked up answers online.
It is very essential for a child to know of the potential risks even before she enter tweendom. Early intervention and education enables the teenager to make responsible decisions on how to use the net and its various functions. For this, open communication between the adult and child is extremely important from early childhood. It is indeed tricky to find the balance between setting boundaries and giving freedom but it must be done early on to enable easy and safe transition of the teenager into adulthood.Almost all teenagers in first-world countries have a strong Internet presence and extensively share personal content and opinions online.
The 2011 Pew Internet survey reported that 95% of U.S. young adults between ages 12 through 17 are online, of whom, 80% have profiles on social media sites, as compared to only 64% of the online population aged 30 and older.
Why is there so much media use among teenagers? The answer lies largely in the change in lifestyle of the upwardly mobile population where increasing numbers of single working parent and dual-working parent households raise latchkey kids and after school programs that eat into play and socialization time of the kids. The lack of time for face-to-face socialization is compounded by practical issues such as mobility difficulties, curfew legislations and parental restrictions that stem from fears of predators, drug dealers and gangs. Changes in society, market and law, along with the advent of Internet and its various applications, have thus resulted in the emergence of a decentralized social life in a virtual setting.
The increased presence of youth online has raised serious concerns about the safety of Internet and social media use. Difficulty in self-regulation, lack of awareness of repercussions of privacy compromise and susceptibility to peer pressure are listed as reasons for teenagers’ cavalier attitude towards online risks such as sexting, cyberbullying and exposure to inappropriate content as they navigate the tricky waters of social media. On the other hand, there has also been
criticism of the moral panic that surrounds the safety of extensive digital (in particular Internet/social networking) use by youth. So, is Internet really a minefield or is it just a digital-extension of the pervasive stereotype that demonizes youth?
Moral panic notwithstanding, the risks of Internet and social media to teenagers is just as real as the risks in society. Cyberbullying, in the forms of name-calling and gossiping, spreading rumors, making threats or otherwise sending malicious messages through emails, message boards and social media, has augmented offline bullying and estimates of the incidence of cyber bullying range from 23 to 72% in various studies (see here , here and
here ). Exposure to age-inappropriate content is another serious risk because it causes much damage to an age-group that is already prone to sexual uncertainty and uncommitted and possibly unsafe sexual exploration. Dangerous communities that support self-harm activities, such as anorexia, drug use, and such other disruptive concepts are also serious pitfalls of unsupervised Internet usage among teens.
Of course, seeing the above risks as standalone perils will raise mass hysteria against youth or Internet or more likely, both. It must be remembered that the online risks to adolescents is a subset of overall teenage hazards. Youngsters already emotionally imbalanced or prone to disruptive behavior are obviously more vulnerable online and are more likely to commit to unsafe or irresponsible actions in the virtual world. However, there are some risks that are common to all youngsters and such risks are largely built on the attitude and behavior of the youth themselves, rather than them being victims of an unfair attack.
Research has shown that there is a positive correlation between parents’ level of privacy concern and that of their teenaged children. Thus, parents can influence their children’s attitudes and behavior through advice and perhaps monitoring the media presence of these teenagers. However, the latter could be a double-edged sword, as teenagers, naturally inclined to rebel against parental insurgence into their private space, may practice deception, which may override any parental measure to increase safety. For example, adolescents may use pseudonyms and false identifying information like age and location to protect themselves, on the advice of their parents. Ironically, the same technique could also be adopted by them to insulate themselves from the eyes of parents.
Many youngsters suppose that security through obscurity is protection enough. Teen bloggers, for example, often believe that their audience is limited to their friends and (less likely) family and could reveal compromising information and exhibit themselves in provocative and socially unacceptable forms. The personal anonymity of the Internet is, however deceptive, especially for teens , who are the focus of two groups of people — parents, teachers, local government officials, etc., who may wish to protect them, and marketers and predators that do harm.
Peluchette and Karl from the University of Southern Indiana found that young adults in the U.S. expressed little concern about sharing updates and pictures on social network sites such as Facebook. Women were more concerned about future employers seeing some of their pictures and comments, especially those related to alcohol, than men. The women were justified by a 2013 survey that reports that 1 of every 10 young job applicants was rejected because of content they had posted on social media , including “provocative or inappropriate photos or posts,” and “content about drinking or using drugs.”
Online victimization of youth is only one head of Janus. The youngster, without proper guidance, could be a perpetrator herself; indeed. A recent study by McAfee reports that 15% of teens have hacked a social network account, 30.7% access pirated movies and music, 8.7% have hacked someone’s email online, 16% of teens having admitted to looking for test answers on their phone and 48.1% of teens having looked up answers online.
It is very essential for a child to know of the potential risks even before she enter tweendom. Early intervention and education enables the teenager to make responsible decisions on how to use the net and its various functions. For this, open communication between the adult and child is extremely important from early childhood. It is indeed tricky to find the balance between setting boundaries and giving freedom but it must be done early on to enable easy and safe transition of the teenager into adulthood.

#Parenting :Teenagers and the New world (internet) Part 1

Almost all teenagers in first-world countries have a strong Internet presence and extensively share personal content and opinions online.
The 2011 Pew Internet survey reported that 95% of U.S. young adults between ages 12 through 17 are online, of whom, 80% have profiles on social media sites, as compared to only 64% of the online population aged 30 and older.
Why is there so much media use among teenagers? The answer lies largely in the change in lifestyle of the upwardly mobile population where increasing numbers of single working parent and dual-working parent households raise latchkey kids and after school programs that eat into play and socialization time of the kids. The lack of time for face-to-face socialization is compounded by practical issues such as mobility difficulties, curfew legislations and parental restrictions that stem from fears of predators, drug dealers and gangs. Changes in society, market and law, along with the advent of Internet and its various applications, have thus resulted in the emergence of a decentralized social life in a virtual setting.
The increased presence of youth online has raised serious concerns about the safety of Internet and social media use. Difficulty in self-regulation, lack of awareness of repercussions of privacy compromise and susceptibility to peer pressure are listed as reasons for teenagers’ cavalier attitude towards online risks such as sexting, cyberbullying and exposure to inappropriate content as they navigate the tricky waters of social media. On the other hand, there has also been
criticism of the moral panic that surrounds the safety of extensive digital (in particular Internet/social networking) use by youth. So, is Internet really a minefield or is it just a digital-extension of the pervasive stereotype that demonizes youth?
Moral panic notwithstanding, the risks of Internet and social media to teenagers is just as real as the risks in society. Cyberbullying, in the forms of name-calling and gossiping, spreading rumors, making threats or otherwise sending malicious messages through emails, message boards and social media, has augmented offline bullying and estimates of the incidence of cyber bullying range from 23 to 72% in various studies (see here , here and
here ). Exposure to age-inappropriate content is another serious risk because it causes much damage to an age-group that is already prone to sexual uncertainty and uncommitted and possibly unsafe sexual exploration. Dangerous communities that support self-harm activities, such as anorexia, drug use, and such other disruptive concepts are also serious pitfalls of unsupervised Internet usage among teens.
Of course, seeing the above risks as standalone perils will raise mass hysteria against youth or Internet or more likely, both. It must be remembered that the online risks to adolescents is a subset of overall teenage hazards. Youngsters already emotionally imbalanced or prone to disruptive behavior are obviously more vulnerable online and are more likely to commit to unsafe or irresponsible actions in the virtual world. However, there are some risks that are common to all youngsters and such risks are largely built on the attitude and behavior of the youth themselves, rather than them being victims of an unfair attack.
Research has shown that there is a positive correlation between parents’ level of privacy concern and that of their teenaged children. Thus, parents can influence their children’s attitudes and behavior through advice and perhaps monitoring the media presence of these teenagers. However, the latter could be a double-edged sword, as teenagers, naturally inclined to rebel against parental insurgence into their private space, may practice deception, which may override any parental measure to increase safety. For example, adolescents may use pseudonyms and false identifying information like age and location to protect themselves, on the advice of their parents. Ironically, the same technique could also be adopted by them to insulate themselves from the eyes of parents.
Many youngsters suppose that security through obscurity is protection enough. Teen bloggers, for example, often believe that their audience is limited to their friends and (less likely) family and could reveal compromising information and exhibit themselves in provocative and socially unacceptable forms. The personal anonymity of the Internet is, however deceptive, especially for teens , who are the focus of two groups of people — parents, teachers, local government officials, etc., who may wish to protect them, and marketers and predators that do harm.
Peluchette and Karl from the University of Southern Indiana found that young adults in the U.S. expressed little concern about sharing updates and pictures on social network sites such as Facebook. Women were more concerned about future employers seeing some of their pictures and comments, especially those related to alcohol, than men. The women were justified by a 2013 survey that reports that 1 of every 10 young job applicants was rejected because of content they had posted on social media , including “provocative or inappropriate photos or posts,” and “content about drinking or using drugs.”
Online victimization of youth is only one head of Janus. The youngster, without proper guidance, could be a perpetrator herself; indeed. A recent study by McAfee reports that 15% of teens have hacked a social network account, 30.7% access pirated movies and music, 8.7% have hacked someone’s email online, 16% of teens having admitted to looking for test answers on their phone and 48.1% of teens having looked up answers online.
It is very essential for a child to know of the potential risks even before she enter tweendom. Early intervention and education enables the teenager to make responsible decisions on how to use the net and its various functions. For this, open communication between the adult and child is extremely important from early childhood. It is indeed tricky to find the balance between setting boundaries and giving freedom but it must be done early on to enable easy and safe transition of the teenager into adulthood.Almost all teenagers in first-world countries have a strong Internet presence and extensively share personal content and opinions online.
The 2011 Pew Internet survey reported that 95% of U.S. young adults between ages 12 through 17 are online, of whom, 80% have profiles on social media sites, as compared to only 64% of the online population aged 30 and older.
Why is there so much media use among teenagers? The answer lies largely in the change in lifestyle of the upwardly mobile population where increasing numbers of single working parent and dual-working parent households raise latchkey kids and after school programs that eat into play and socialization time of the kids. The lack of time for face-to-face socialization is compounded by practical issues such as mobility difficulties, curfew legislations and parental restrictions that stem from fears of predators, drug dealers and gangs. Changes in society, market and law, along with the advent of Internet and its various applications, have thus resulted in the emergence of a decentralized social life in a virtual setting.
The increased presence of youth online has raised serious concerns about the safety of Internet and social media use. Difficulty in self-regulation, lack of awareness of repercussions of privacy compromise and susceptibility to peer pressure are listed as reasons for teenagers’ cavalier attitude towards online risks such as sexting, cyberbullying and exposure to inappropriate content as they navigate the tricky waters of social media. On the other hand, there has also been
criticism of the moral panic that surrounds the safety of extensive digital (in particular Internet/social networking) use by youth. So, is Internet really a minefield or is it just a digital-extension of the pervasive stereotype that demonizes youth?
Moral panic notwithstanding, the risks of Internet and social media to teenagers is just as real as the risks in society. Cyberbullying, in the forms of name-calling and gossiping, spreading rumors, making threats or otherwise sending malicious messages through emails, message boards and social media, has augmented offline bullying and estimates of the incidence of cyber bullying range from 23 to 72% in various studies (see here , here and
here ). Exposure to age-inappropriate content is another serious risk because it causes much damage to an age-group that is already prone to sexual uncertainty and uncommitted and possibly unsafe sexual exploration. Dangerous communities that support self-harm activities, such as anorexia, drug use, and such other disruptive concepts are also serious pitfalls of unsupervised Internet usage among teens.
Of course, seeing the above risks as standalone perils will raise mass hysteria against youth or Internet or more likely, both. It must be remembered that the online risks to adolescents is a subset of overall teenage hazards. Youngsters already emotionally imbalanced or prone to disruptive behavior are obviously more vulnerable online and are more likely to commit to unsafe or irresponsible actions in the virtual world. However, there are some risks that are common to all youngsters and such risks are largely built on the attitude and behavior of the youth themselves, rather than them being victims of an unfair attack.
Research has shown that there is a positive correlation between parents’ level of privacy concern and that of their teenaged children. Thus, parents can influence their children’s attitudes and behavior through advice and perhaps monitoring the media presence of these teenagers. However, the latter could be a double-edged sword, as teenagers, naturally inclined to rebel against parental insurgence into their private space, may practice deception, which may override any parental measure to increase safety. For example, adolescents may use pseudonyms and false identifying information like age and location to protect themselves, on the advice of their parents. Ironically, the same technique could also be adopted by them to insulate themselves from the eyes of parents.
Many youngsters suppose that security through obscurity is protection enough. Teen bloggers, for example, often believe that their audience is limited to their friends and (less likely) family and could reveal compromising information and exhibit themselves in provocative and socially unacceptable forms. The personal anonymity of the Internet is, however deceptive, especially for teens , who are the focus of two groups of people — parents, teachers, local government officials, etc., who may wish to protect them, and marketers and predators that do harm.
Peluchette and Karl from the University of Southern Indiana found that young adults in the U.S. expressed little concern about sharing updates and pictures on social network sites such as Facebook. Women were more concerned about future employers seeing some of their pictures and comments, especially those related to alcohol, than men. The women were justified by a 2013 survey that reports that 1 of every 10 young job applicants was rejected because of content they had posted on social media , including “provocative or inappropriate photos or posts,” and “content about drinking or using drugs.”
Online victimization of youth is only one head of Janus. The youngster, without proper guidance, could be a perpetrator herself; indeed. A recent study by McAfee reports that 15% of teens have hacked a social network account, 30.7% access pirated movies and music, 8.7% have hacked someone’s email online, 16% of teens having admitted to looking for test answers on their phone and 48.1% of teens having looked up answers online.
It is very essential for a child to know of the potential risks even before she enter tweendom. Early intervention and education enables the teenager to make responsible decisions on how to use the net and its various functions. For this, open communication between the adult and child is extremely important from early childhood. It is indeed tricky to find the balance between setting boundaries and giving freedom but it must be done early on to enable easy and safe transition of the teenager into adulthood.